kidsfest
workshops

Scars Upon My Heart

Scars Upon My Heart

Anne Harvey,
Charlotte Harvey,
Elizabeth Counsell &
Richard Furstenheim

Sunday 14 September
10.30am - 12pm
£10

During the First World War, 'nobody asked what the women thought'. This programme, compiled by Anne Harvey, based on the best-selling Virago anthology, offers in words, captured in diaries, memoirs and poetry, what many women felt.

Anne, accompanied by Charlotte Harvey and Elizabeth Counsell, will read extracts that portray the spirit and heartbreak of an age against a backdrop of songs and music of the time, played by Richard Furstenheim.

Vera Britten's poems are read with the permission of her estate.

Fragile Empire<br>How Russia Fell In And Out Of Love<br>With Vladimir Putin

Fragile Empire
How Russia Fell In And Out Of Love
With Vladimir Putin

Ben Judah talks to Peter Pomerantsev

Sunday 14 September
12.30-1.30pm
£8

Written with rare access to the oligarchs and officials who made the Putin era and the new opposition who are trying to destroy it, Fragile Empire is a journey through a frenzied Moscow and beyond. Ben Judah argues that Russia's leader is not the strongman he appears. Putin may be victorious as a politician, but he has utterly failed to build a modern state. Putin's regime is now increasingly loathed for incompetence and corruption.

Judah is an intrepid reporter and classy political scientist.
Luke Harding, The Guardian

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Ben Judah was born in 1988, less than three years before the collapse of the Soviet Union. He has reported from the abandoned Gulags of Kolyma, tracked a Yeti in Tajikistan, and covered the Georgian war and the revolutionary collapse of Kyrgyzstan. His work has featured in the Financial Times, the Economist, Prospect and Standpoint. He reported for Reuters in Moscow before joining the European Council on Foreign Relations in London as a Russia analyst. He is currently a visiting fellow at the European Stability Initiative. Foreign Policy named Fragile Empire on of its Top 25 Books to Read in 2013.

Peter Pomerantsev is an award-winning contributor to the London Review of Books and Newsweek. His writing is translated and republished across the world in such publications as Le Monde Diplomatique, El Pais and Internationale, and has led to regular media and public appearances. Apart from media he has also worked as a consultant for the EU and World Bank on development projects in Russia, dealing directly with federal and regional governments.

Bricks and Mortals: Ten Great Buildings And The People They Made

Bricks and Mortals: Ten Great Buildings And The People They Made

With Tom Wilkinson

Sunday 14 September
12.30-1.30pm
£8

A brilliant exploration of the power of architecture through ten key buildings across the world. From the remains of the Tower of Babel to the Ford car plant, Tom Wilkinson unpicks these structures to reveal the lives of the people who built and used them. Can architecture change our lives for the better?

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Tom Wilkinson is writing a doctoral thesis on art history at University College London, where he teaches an undergraduate course on architectural history. He has lectured on the history of art and architecture at the Courtauld Gallery and the University of Oxford. He has lived in Shanghai and Berlin, and speaks Chinese and German.

Secret Scientists and Spies

Secret Scientists and Spies

Nigel West & Taylor Downing
Talk to Paula Kitching

Sunday 14 September
12.30-1.30pm
£8

Top secret activities are a vital cog in the successful outcome of modern warfare. In 1921, MI5 commissioned a detailed review of its First World War operations. Bestselling writer and historian Nigel West's MI5 in the Great War is a version of that top-secret history, edited and brought up to date. Taylor Downing's Secret Warriors delves into previously unexplored primary sources in order to reveal the unknown side of The Great War, profiling a number of the key figures who made great leaps in science for the benefit of 20th Century Britain.

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Nigel West is the pen name of Rupert Allason, an author specialising in security, intelligence, secret service and espionage issues.

Taylor Downing is a television producer and writer. He was educated at Cambridge University and went on to become Managing Director and Head of History at Flashback Television, an independent production company. His most recent books include Spies in the Sky, Churchill's War Lab, Cold War (with Sir Jeremy Isaacs) and Night Raid.

Paula Kitching is an historian, writer and educational consultant with historical specialisms in war, genocides and cultural history. She has written for educational publications, books, museums and websites, and is a speaker and lecturer for young people and adult education. She is also an experienced battlefield and heritage guide.

The Food of Italy

The Food of Italy

Claudia Roden talks to Anthony Silverman about Italian Food

Sunday 14 September
12.30-1.30pm
£10

First published 25 years ago, The Food of Italy remains the most authoritative and approachable guide to one of the world's best-loved cuisines. Join Claudia Roden, back at Ivy House once again, as she talks about her signature recipes adapted to fit modern tastes.

My favourite cookbook is Claudia Roden's The Food of Italy. Her writing is wonderful and she is incredibly thorough. I love this book in particular.'
Russell Norman, Polpo

This event is in association with Gefiltefest.

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Claudia Roden was born and brought up in Cairo, and educated in Paris and in London, where she has lived for many years. Widely admired as both a great cook and a fine writer, she has written classic works on Middle Eastern food and Mediterranean cookery including The Book of Jewish Food and The Food of Spain.

Anthony Silverman is the Silverbrow food blogger and tweeter.

A Celebration

A Celebration

Lynne Reid Banks
Talks to Hester Abrams

Sunday 14 September
2-3pm
£10

Author of more than 45 books for children and adults, Lynne Reid Banks is one of our best loved authors. Her children's favourite The Indian in the Cupboard has sold nearly six million copies worldwide while her 1960 debut novel The L-Shaped Room, which caused outrage at the time, is regarded as a classic. Honoured in 2013 with the J.M. Barrie Award by Action for Children's Arts, Reid Banks has become a national treasure.

Her latest book, Uprooted, is a captivating story of a wartime childhood, heavily influenced by her own experience and time spent in Canada.

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Lynne Reid Banks is a best-selling author for children and adults. Her classic children's novel The Indian in the Cupboard has sold nearly six million copies worldwide and was made into a highly successful feature film. She was born in London in 1929 and worked as an actress, writer and TV news reporter.

Lynne has written forty five books: her first, The L-Shaped Room, was published in 1960 and caused outrage in more conservative quarters for its portrayal of a an unmarried mother-to-be who is thrown out by her father and has to live in the L-shaped room of the title. Lynne says that writing for children comes much more easily than writing for adults.

Hester Abrams is a journalist and literary consultant who in 2013 and 2014 was Director of Jewish Book Week held at Kings Place, London.

Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

Poems That Make Grown Men Cry

Anthony & Ben Holden
Talk to Geoff Martin

Sunday 14 September
2-3pm
£8

Grown men aren't supposed to cry but in the Holden's fascinating anthology, recently featured in The Times Bestsellers list, one hundred distinguished men confess to being moved to tears by poems that haunt them. From John le Carré and Salman Rushdie to Daniel Radcliffe, Nick Cave, Stephen Fry, and Colin Firth, among others, this collection delivers a private insight into the souls of men who are admired around the world.

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Anthony Holden is an award-winning journalist and biographer who has published more than thirty books, including lives of Shakespeare, Tchaikovsky and Laurence Olivier. He is also the author of three autobiographical books about poker, as well as translations of opera and ancient Greek plays and poetry.

Ben Holden is a writer and film producer. Like his father, he lives in London and studied English at Merton College, Oxford.

Geoff Martin is Editor in Chief of Archant North London.

Tigerman

Tigerman

Nick Harkaway talks to John Crace

Sunday 14 September
2-3pm
£8

From the highly acclaimed author of The Gone-Away World and Angelmaker comes Nick Harkaway's brilliant new novel about ex-colonies, superheroes and paternal love. Lester Ferris, a sergeant in the British Army, is a good man in need of a rest. Mancreu is the ideal place to serve out his time - a former British colony in legal limbo - but Lester has made a friend: a brilliant, Internet-addled street kid who might become his adopted son. The boy needs Lester to be more than just an observer.

'Wildly imaginative...Wonderfully entertaining.'
The Times

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Nick Harkaway is the author of the novels The Gone-away World and Angelmaker, and The Blind Giant, a non-fiction book about technology and how it affects us. He won the Oxfam Emerging Writer prize at the Hay Festival in 2012. Angelmaker won the Red Tentacle at the Kitschies and was shortlisted for the Clarke Award.

John Crace, feature writer for The Guardian, is best known for the literary parody Digested Read. His books include Baby Alarm and The Second Half. His book, Vertigo: One Fan's Fear of Success (2011) is the story of the existential futility that comes from 40 years supporting Spurs.

Sassoon and Rosenberg -<br>Jewish World War 1 Poets

Sassoon and Rosenberg -
Jewish World War 1 Poets

Jean Moorcroft Wilson
Talks to Paula Kitching

Sunday 14 September
2-3pm
£8

Leading expert on First World War literature, Jean Moorcroft Wilson, gives us her insight into two of the century's greatest Jewish poets; Siegfried Sassoon and Isaac Rosenberg. Previously a patriot, Sassoon emerged as one of the angry young writers satirising the 'Old Men' who in Sassoon's opinion were responsible for the needless death of millions. Jean traces the origins both of Sassoon's patriotism and of his anti-war stance that culminated in questions to Parliament. Rosenberg, the son of impoverished immigrant Russian Jews, served as a private in the army and his perspective on the trenches is quite different from the other mainly officer-poets.

You smug-faced crowds with kindling eye
Who cheer when soldier-lads march by,
Sneek home and pray you'll never know
The hell where youth and laughter go.

Siegfried Sassoon

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Jean Moorcroft Wilson lectures in English Literature at the University of London. She is married to Virginia Woolf's nephew, with whom she runs a publishing house. Her previous books include two other biographies of First World War poets; Charles Hamilton Sorley and Isaac Rosenberg. She is considered the foremost expert on Siegfried Sassoon.

Paula Kitching is an historian, writer and educational consultant with historical specialisms in war, genocides and cultural history. She has written for educational publications, books, museums and websites, and is a speaker and lecturer for young people and adult education. She is also an experienced battlefield and heritage guide.

The Bloomsbury Cookbook:<br>Recipes for Life, Love and Art

The Bloomsbury Cookbook:
Recipes for Life, Love and Art

With Jans Ondaatje Rolls

Sunday 14 September
3.30-4.30pm
£8

Artistic and intellectual, the Bloomsbury Group were also the 'foodies' of their day. E.M. Forster, Roger Fry, Vanessa Bell, Dora Carrington, J.M.Keynes and Lytton Strachey, among others, often met for 'lingering breakfasts' and 'painting lunches'. Jans Ondaatje Rolls casts new light on Bloomsbury with samples of recipes and references to food and drink that she found in their diaries, letters and memoirs.

If you would like to know more about Bloomsbury, join Blue Badge Guide, Isabelle Seddon on Monday 15 September, 1.30-3.30pm for a literary walk around Bloomsbury, click here.

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Jans Ondaatje Rolls is the author of Bosham Bisque and Chester Chowder.

The Storms of War

The Storms of War

With Kate Williams

Sunday 14 September
3.30-4.30pm
£8

With gripping detail and brilliant empathy, popular TV historian Kate Williams tells the story of the De Witt family as they are buffeted and changed by the storms of war. In summer 1914, life is good for them. Celia, the youngest child, on the brink of adulthood, secretly dreams of escaping her carefully mapped-out future. But war changes everything. Celia struggles to make sense of the changing world, lies about her age to join the war effort and puts not only herself but those she loves in danger.

'A beautifully conjured family saga. Fans of Downton Abbey will love it'
Alison Weir

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Kate Williams is an author, social historian, constitutional and royal expert, broadcaster and novelist. Kate studied at Somerville College, Oxford and Queen Mary, University of London. She also took an MA in Creative Writing at Royal Holloway, where she now teaches. Author of five acclaimed non-fiction historical titles and one novel, Kate appears regularly on radio and television as an expert on historical, royal and constitutional matters.

Finding The Plot

Finding The Plot

With Ann Treneman

Sunday 14 September
3.30-4.30pm
£8

The Festival welcomes back hilarious Times parliamentary sketch writer, Ann Treneman who has branched out - to graveyards. The Tibetans have the Book of the Dead. This is Ann Treneman's Book of the 'Dead Interesting'. Meet the real War Horse, Byron and his dog Boatswain, prime ministers, royalty, Florence Nightingale and her pet owl, highwaymen, the real James Bond and, of course, M. Absurd and astounding, Ann provides an entertaining guide to the Anglo-Saxon underworld!

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Ann Treneman is an award-winning journalist who has been the parliamentary sketch writer for The Times for ten years. She has also worked as a feature writer for The Times and The Independent and was previously foreign editor of The Observer. Born in America, she has lived in Britain for the past thirty years. She is the author of two books of parliamentary sketches: Dave & Nick: The Year of The Honeymoon (2011) and Annus Horribilis: The Worst Year in British Politics (2009).

Piano Man: A Life of John Ogdon

Piano Man: A Life of John Ogdon

Charles Beauclerk
Talks to Jessica Duchen

Sunday 14 September
3.30-4.30pm
£8

John Ogdon was a man whose feelings were inexpressibly deep and often tormenting. His glory days, following his coveted Tchaikovsky prize in 1962, came to a sudden end in 1973 when he suffered a severe mental breakdown, was certified insane and made a patient of the Court of Protection. Charles Beauclerk discusses the life of this tortured genius, arguably the greatest British pianist of all time, with music journalist Jessica Duchen.

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Charles Beauclerk is the author of a biography of his ancestor Nell Gwyn and a book on Shakespeare.

Journalist Jessica Duchen writes regularly for The Independent and has interviewed most of the world's finest musicians. Her work appears frequently in BBC Music Magazine, Opera News, Pianist Magazine, Classical Music and The Strad, among others, and she contributes to BBC Radio 3.

Banks - A Byword for Incompetence<br>And Greed?

Banks - A Byword for Incompetence
And Greed?

Alex Brummer & Hugh Pym
Talk to Simon Lewis

Sunday 14 September
5-6pm
£10

Sponsored by Stratstone of Mayfair.

Two of our most eminent economic journalists talk to Simon Lewis, Chief Executive of the Association for Financial Markets in Europe, to give their insider view of the financial crisis that rocked the City and continues to resonate through our financial institutions today. Brummer's Bad Banks and Pym's Inside the Banking Crisis provide a unique insight into the truth behind the scandal and its implications for our confidence in the probity and future of the Square Mile.

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Alex Brummer is one of the UK's leading financial journalists and commentators. After a long and successful stint at the Guardian he moved to be City editor of the Daily Mail in 2000. He has won prizes both as a foreign correspondent and economics writer; awards received include Business Journalist of the Year 2006, Newspaper Journalist 2002 and Best City Journalist 2000.

As Chief Economics Correspondent for BBC News, Hugh Pym is one of only a handful of broadcast correspondents to have covered the financial crisis from its origins in 2007 to the present. He was part of the BBC News Team which won an award for their coverage of the crisis.Since then he has been Chief Economics Correspondent for BBC News, covering major economic and banking developments.

Simon Lewis was appointed as the Prime Minister's Official Spokesman and Director of Communications at No. 10 Downing Street in June 2009. Following the General Election in May 2010 he was appointed Strategic Communications Advisor at UKTI. From 2004 to 2009 he was Global Director of Corporate Affairs at Vodafone Group. In October 2011 he was appointed CEO of the association of financial markets in Europe which represents the European investment banking industry.

The Lives of Others

The Lives of Others

Neel Mukherjee talks to Hester Abrams

Sunday 14 September
5-6pm
£8

Calcutta, 1967. Unnoticed by his family, Supratik has become dangerously involved in extremist political activism. The Ghoshes, preside over their large household, unaware that beneath the barely ruffled surface of their lives the sands are shifting. Ambitious, rich and compassionate, The Lives of Others anatomises the very soul of a nation in all its contradictions as it unfolds a family history.

'Sharp, disturbing and precisely written'
A.S. Byatt, TLS

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Neel Mukherjee was born in Calcutta. His first novel, A Life Apart (2010), won the Vodafone - Crossword Award in India, the Writers' Guild of Great Britain Award for best fiction, and was shortlisted for the inaugural DSC Prize for South Asian Literature. This is his second novel.

Hester Abrams is a journalist and literary consultant who in 2013 and 2014 was Director of Jewish Book Week held at Kings Place, London.

The Sure Thing:<br>The Greatest Coup<br>In Horse Racing History

The Sure Thing:
The Greatest Coup
In Horse Racing History

Nick Townsend talks to Stephen Kon

Sunday 14 September
6.30-7.30pm
£8

A compelling insight into how legendary gambler Barney Curley - folk hero or card shark - pulled off the greatest horse betting coup in history. Curley won millions of pounds through his bets, transformed from a priest to a punter, survived a near fatal virus and founded the charity, DAFA (Direct Aid For Africa).

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Nick Townsend was, for many years, a sports feature writer on the Daily Mail before joining the Independent on Sunday, initially as a football correspondent and later chief sports writer. He is currently a freelance writer, predominantly for the Sunday Times. He collaborated with Sir Steve Redgrave and Sir Ben Ainslie on their autobiographies. He is a long-time confidant of Barney Curley and assisted him with his acclaimed life story Giving a Little Back.

Stephen Kon is Senior partner of King & Wood Mallesons SJ Berwin, an unsuccessful small time punter and a former race horse owner, with a lifetime love of horse racing.

My Life in Agony:<br>Confessions of <br>A Professional Agony Aunt

My Life in Agony:
Confessions of
A Professional Agony Aunt

Irma Kurtz talks to Claire Armitstead

Sunday 14 September
6.30-7.30pm
£10

Warm, funny and perceptive, brimming with wisdom and insight, Irma Kurtz' new book is a meditation on the subjects that concern and confuse us the most: mother-daughter relationships, eating disorders, office politics and those perennial areas of interest: love and sex. As Cosmopolitan's professional agony aunt for the last forty years, Irma has had to deal with the most intimate problems of successive generations of readers.

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Irma Kurtz has been Cosmopolitan's agony aunt for the past forty years. After taking a degree in English Literature, Irma travelled around Europe before finally settling in London. There she joined the brand-new Cosmopolitan magazine and launched its iconic agony-aunt column, which she then also wrote for the American edition. Irma has written two novels, three travel books and three self-help books, including the critically acclaimed About Time: Growing Old Disgracefully.

Claire Armitstead is the Guardian's literary editor. She was previously arts editor, having worked as a theatre critic for the Ham & High, the Financial Times and the Guardian. As a published author, she has contributed essays to New Performance and Women: A Cultural Review. She makes regular appearances on radio and television as a cultural commentator on literature and the arts.

Trials and Tribulations

Trials and Tribulations

Nick Stone & M.R. Hall
Talk to Peter Guttridge

Sunday 14 September
6.30-7.30pm
£10

Award winning writer, Nick Stone, joins former successful criminal barrister, now author, M R Hall, and crime writer Peter Guttridge to discuss crime, trials and the art of writing enthralling thrillers packed with twists, turns, foul play and betrayals.

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Nick Stone was born in Cambridge in 1966, the son of a Scottish father and a Haitian mother. His first novel, Mr Clarinet, won the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger, the International Thriller Writers Award for Best First Novel and the Macavity Award for Best First Novel, and was nominated for The Barry Award for Best British Novel.

M.R. Hall is a Bafta nominated screenwriter, producer and former criminal barrister. Educated at Hereford Cathedral School and Worcester College, Oxford, he lives in Monmouthshire with his wife and two sons. Aside from writing, his main passion is the preservation and planting of woodland. In his spare moments, he is mostly to be found among trees.

Peter Guttridge is a novelist, critic, writing teacher and a chairperson/interviewer at a wide range of literature festivals and events. He is a former Director of the Brighton Literature Festival and for eleven years - until 2011 - was the Observer newspaper's crime fiction critic. He is the author of ten novels, two works of non-fiction and numerous short stories.

Saving Grace

Saving Grace

Jane Green talks to Olivia Lichtenstein

Sunday 14 September
6.30-7.30pm
£10

From the number one bestselling author of Tempting Fate and The Accidental Husband comes Jane Green's stunning new novel about a shattered marriage and a devastating betrayal Grace Chapman has the perfect life, living comfortably with her husband, bestselling author Ted. When Ted advertises for a new assistant, Beth walks into their lives and quickly makes herself indispensable. But Grace soon begins to feel side-lined in her home - and her marriage. Is Grace just paranoid, as her husband tells her, or is there more to Beth than first thought?

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A former feature writer for the Daily Express, Jane Green took a leap of faith when she left in 1996 to freelance and work on her book. She is now the bestselling author of thirteen novels.

Olivia Lichtenstein is a BAFTA award winning documentary filmmaker and the former editor of BBC's Inside Story. She directed The Twins of the Twin Towers for BBC1 to commemorate the 10th anniversary of 9/11 and is currently producing and directing, Inside Guinness World Records for ITV. Her last novel Things Your Mother Never Told You (Orion, September 2009) is a sharp, compelling and deliciously entertaining follow up to her acclaimed, award-winning debut Mrs Zhivago of Queen's Park.